Classic Cinema

Review: Gaslight

Review: Gaslight

Year: 1944 | Rating: Gaslight is a slow-burn (shameless pun intended). The first half-hour or so was pretty bumpy as the story got established, but once the mystery really deepened and Ingrid Bergman leaned into her virtuosic performance, it really sucked me in and didn't let me go until the very end. What I think I appreciate most about this film is how much the screenwriters chose to give away fairly early in the story, and yet it's still a mystery that throws curveballs at the audience all the way throughout. I daresay that even if I hadn't already known the "twist" thanks…
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Review: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Review: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Year: 1966 | Rating: This is one of the most batshit crazy films I have ever seen in my life. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? walked so that Uncut Gems (2019) and Shiva Baby (2020) could run. I feel like I've been put through the wringer, like I've borne witness to something that I wasn't supposed to see. There's literally nothing that can be said about Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor's legendary performances in this film that hasn't been said before, but I think that an aspect that is often overlooked (in my opinion, due to the massive success and cultural ubiquity of The Graduate [1967]) is how…
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Review: Rashomon

Review: Rashomon

Original title: RashômonYear: 1950 | Rating: Given the number of films, TV shows and other media that have copied its basic structure over the years, would it be safe to claim that Rashomon is one of the most influential films of the mid-20th century (if not ever)? I think so. Amazingly, though, with so many derivative works floating around out there, some of which are quite good in their own right (e.g. The Last Duel [2021]), the original somehow manages to remain perhaps the greatest example of the form, thanks to legendary director Akira Kurosawa's singular vision and insistence on not revealing which…
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Review: Mirror

Review: Mirror

Original title: ZerkaloYear: 1975 | Rating: It occurs to me now for the first time that due to recent events, my watching and logging of Mirror could be seen as a political action, but I must confess that this was simply the next film in my "to be watched" stack of Blu-rays, and I inserted the disc into my Playstation without even the slightest of thoughts to current world events. It does make me wonder, though, exactly what that political statement might be in the context of this film, and of Andrei Tarkovsky's life in general. Later on, he was an effective…
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