Queer Cinema

Review: For a Lost Soldier

Review: For a Lost Soldier

Original title: Voor een verloren soldaatYear: 1992 | Rating: Content Warning: This review mentions pedophilia and the sexual abuse of a child. Moreover, For a Lost Soldier explicitly depicts the grooming and sexual abuse of a child, including a sex scene between an adult and a child. If any of that makes you uncomfortable, I recommend that you do not read this review, nor do I suggest that you watch the film in question. I doubt that many of you reading this have ever heard of For a Lost Soldier, and any of you that have probably already know what it's…
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Review: The Long Day Closes

Review: The Long Day Closes

Year: 1992 | Rating: It had been nearly ten years since I'd seen The Long Day Closes, so I only remembered a few specific fragments of the of actual piece, certain shots and musical cues. This is actually incredibly fitting for this film, though, because while the details may have been fuzzy, one thing that you never forget, whether it be about childhood events or green films, is how they make you feel. The reason that I remembered loving this film has nothing to do with the images on the screen, but rather with the emotions that those images evoked…
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Review: Of Time and the City

Review: Of Time and the City

Year: 2008 | Rating: You know, it's a funny thing: Counting the "Terence Davies trilogy" (1983) as one film, I have now seen four of Terence Davies' films, and they all portray more or less the same story of growing up in Liverpool in the '40s and '50s, struggling with the ever-looming guilt and repression of Catholicism, and coping with being a gay man at a time when it was very socially unacceptable to be homosexual. You would think, then, that by the time Of Time and the City was released in 2008, telling the same story over and over…
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Review: The Terence Davies Trilogy

Review: The Terence Davies Trilogy

Year: 1983 | Rating: While it would be fair to say that the so-called "Terence Davies trilogy" (consisting of short films Children [1976], Madonna and Child [1980] and Death and Transfiguration [1983]) at many times feels like a thesis for his later feature films Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988) and The Long Day Closes (1992) (which, along with "Trilogy," make up an autobiographical trilogy of their own), it's also undeniable that these are the most provocative films that I've seen from Terence Davies so far; Madonna and Child, in particular, feels downright raunchy in a couple of different instances.  This collection of short films is certainly the most outwardly homosexual of…
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Review: Distant Voices, Still Lives

Review: Distant Voices, Still Lives

Year: 1988 | Rating: Simply put, Distant Voices, Still Lives is a beautiful little revelation of a film. The only Terence Davies film I had seen before this was The Long Day Closes (1992), which I consider a masterpiece and one of my favorite films of all time, and as is often the case when the first film I see of a filmmaker's speaks to me so vividly, I had both been looking forward and hesitant to check out more of Davies' work for many years, in the slight fear that none of his other films would affect me as much…
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Review: Happy Together

Review: Happy Together

Original title: Chun gwong cha sitYear: 1997 | Rating: Holy smokes. It's been a long time since I've seen a film in which every single frame feels like an innovation, like something I've truly never seen before. The style that director Wong Kar-Wai, cinematographer Christopher Doyle and editor William Chang achieve with Happy Together is simply remarkable. I doubt that there's anything that I could possibly say about the camerawork that hasn't been said before, so instead I'll just say this: Wow. But beyond that, Happy Together is exactly the kind of film for which Western audiences have been begging for years: a…
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Review: Fire Island

Review: Fire Island

Year: 2022 | Rating: I am literally shocked by the unanimously positive reception that Fire Island has received. I don't check reviews before I watch a film, so it's absolutely blowing my mind that it currently sits at 93% on Rotten Tomatoes and 3.7 on Letterboxd. Do we all collectively have a lower bar for gay content? But then again, so do I, and Fire Island still failed to clear it. Horrible voiceover, a horrible main character, a horrible love interest, a confusing timeline, never more than just a chuckle at the few jokes that landed. I also wonder who, exactly, this movie…
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Review: We the Animals

Review: We the Animals

Year: 2018 | Rating: Despite being perhaps the most empathetic art form humans possess, it's surprisingly rare that you can say that a film perfectly evokes the real-life experiences that it portrays. Personally, I've only experienced that feeling less than a handful of times in my life, but it's a high that I chase with every single film that I watch; I'm constantly in the pursuit of that indescribable feeling of being seen, of realizing that somebody else somewhere knows what I've been through and has captured that feeling so that other people can get a better understanding of why I…
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Review: Just Friends

Review: Just Friends

Original title: Gewoon vriendenYear: 2018 | Rating: Based on the generic, non-licensed music (some of which was attempted to be passed off as Sufjan Stevens and Bon Iver, which is completely and utterly ridiculous) and quality of some the shots (especially the flashbacks), I at first assumed that Just Friends was a super low-budget production that was maybe made independently and submitted to some festivals by some first-time filmmaker who was chasing their dreams, and I felt kinda bad about not liking it very much. But then I did some research, and discovered that this film was actually financed by…
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