Terence Davies

Review: The Long Day Closes

Review: The Long Day Closes

Year: 1992 | Rating: It had been nearly ten years since I'd seen The Long Day Closes, so I only remembered a few specific fragments of the of actual piece, certain shots and musical cues. This is actually incredibly fitting for this film, though, because while the details may have been fuzzy, one thing that you never forget, whether it be about childhood events or green films, is how they make you feel. The reason that I remembered loving this film has nothing to do with the images on the screen, but rather with the emotions that those images evoked…
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Review: Of Time and the City

Review: Of Time and the City

Year: 2008 | Rating: You know, it's a funny thing: Counting the "Terence Davies trilogy" (1983) as one film, I have now seen four of Terence Davies' films, and they all portray more or less the same story of growing up in Liverpool in the '40s and '50s, struggling with the ever-looming guilt and repression of Catholicism, and coping with being a gay man at a time when it was very socially unacceptable to be homosexual. You would think, then, that by the time Of Time and the City was released in 2008, telling the same story over and over…
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Review: The Terence Davies Trilogy

Review: The Terence Davies Trilogy

Year: 1983 | Rating: While it would be fair to say that the so-called "Terence Davies trilogy" (consisting of short films Children [1976], Madonna and Child [1980] and Death and Transfiguration [1983]) at many times feels like a thesis for his later feature films Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988) and The Long Day Closes (1992) (which, along with "Trilogy," make up an autobiographical trilogy of their own), it's also undeniable that these are the most provocative films that I've seen from Terence Davies so far; Madonna and Child, in particular, feels downright raunchy in a couple of different instances.  This collection of short films is certainly the most outwardly homosexual of…
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Review: Distant Voices, Still Lives

Review: Distant Voices, Still Lives

Year: 1988 | Rating: Simply put, Distant Voices, Still Lives is a beautiful little revelation of a film. The only Terence Davies film I had seen before this was The Long Day Closes (1992), which I consider a masterpiece and one of my favorite films of all time, and as is often the case when the first film I see of a filmmaker's speaks to me so vividly, I had both been looking forward and hesitant to check out more of Davies' work for many years, in the slight fear that none of his other films would affect me as much…
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